Course Information

for Rabbinics Department

 

Rabbinics Proficiency Exam (RB3100x)

Credits:3

Sefer HaMitzvot (RB3180)

Credits:3

Introduction to the main textual resources of rabbinic literature, with focus on understanding the context and use of the material in rabbinic studies.

Basic Texts of Jewish Life (RB3195)

Credits:3

Study of Pirkei Avot, a classic Jewish text of rabbinic perspectives on life, and portions of Sefer HaMitzvot by the Rambam (Maimonides), providing an overarching perspective on the structure of Jewish life and law.

Introduction to Mishnah and Talmud (RB3200)

Credits:3

Analysis of the literary and structural features of the Mishnah, with emphasis on developing skills in reading and interpreting the text and working with commentaries. Prerequisite: Hebrew I or equivalent.

Beit Midrash (RB3210)

Credits:1

Supervised study accompanying rabbinic text courses; required concurrent enrollment for students in Talmud classes.

Codes (RB3230)

Credits:3

Literature of the Codes from traditional perspectives. After a survey of the history of code literature and issues, students will undertake textual study of specific works such as Maimonides’ Mishneh Torah, the Shulchan Aruch, and of response literature.

Fixing God's Torah (RB3250)

Credits:3

Criticism of the Bible in Talmud and commentaries, using a variety of sources in English and Hebrew. Formerly RAB 290.

Studies in Midrash (RB3270)

Credits:3

Study of selected portions of midrashic literature such as Midrash Rabbah, Yalkut Shemoni, and others, introducing students to the world of rabbinic theology and ethics as expressed through tale and metaphor. Repeatable with permission of instructor.

Talmud I (RB3301)

Credits:3

Study of selected portions of Talmudic tractates with halachic and aggadic themes. After a consideration of the Mishnaic foundations, this course introduces students to the methods and language of Talmud, with gradual improvement in skills of language and approach, particularly Talmudic “organic logic.” Study of selected sugyot will illuminate specific Jewish religious values. Prerequisite: HB 2003 and RB 3200. Concurrent registration in RB 3210 required; students must participate fully in Beit Midrash in order to receive credit for Talmud.

Talmud II (RB3302)

Credits:3

Continuation of RB 3301.

Talmud III (RB3303)

Credits:3

Continuation of RB 3302.

Talmud Topics (RB3310)

Credits:3

Study of specific topics with attention to skills, for broadening the student’s scope of knowledge and developing greater familiarity with the idiom of the Babylonian Talmud. Co-requisite: RB 3210. Repeatable for different topics.

Choshen Mishpat (RB3340)

Credits:3

The essential section of the codes of Jewish law relating to ethical practice in daily life, including business ethics and high standards of behavior in the community and workplace.

Guard Your Soul (RB3341)

Credits:3

Food and kashrut, health, and the environment in Jewish law.

The Value of Life and Lives (RB3342)

Credits:3

Ethical reflections on human and animal life based in rabbinic texts.

Bikkur Cholim and Avelut (RB3345)

Credits:3

Laws of visiting the sick and those in mourning.

Resources and Methods in Rabbinics: The Rabbi’s Library (RB3380)

Credits:3

How to access and employ the bibliographical, textual, and electronic media to locate information, research topics, and develop your own “Rabbi’s Library” for divrei Torah and other purposes. Required for all rabbinical students. Formerly RAB 410.

Talmud Seminar (RB3400)

Credits:3

Building on the skills already acquired, the student begins to understand complex Talmudic arguments and delves further into the commentaries of Rashi and the Tosafot. Rishonim, Codes, and Responsa on specific Talmudic issues may be used to understand the ongoing dialogue on major issues. Repeatable as topics vary. Prerequisite: RB 3303 and TN 3301; concurrent enrollment in RB 3210 required. Students must participate fully in Beit Midrash in order to receive credit.

Sephardic Thought (RB3420)

Credits:3

In-depth study of Talmud and Midrash as strategies of discourse in specific historical contexts, with emphasis on detecting implicit assumptions and core values of the rabbis. Selections will be chosen to illuminate the texts, based on recent studies of the role of sages and students, gender issues, and the relations between Jews and other peoples. Prerequisite: RB 3300 (Intermediate Talmud) or permission of instructor.

Halakha in Business (RB3466)

Credits:3

Special Topics in Talmud and Rabbinic Studies (RB3495)

Credits:3

Special topics in the Talmud, rabbinic theology, or responsa literature; advanced studies in Aggada; or comparative studies in Palestinian and Babylonian Talmuds.

Special Topics in Talmud and Rabbinic Studies (RB3496)

Credits:3

Special topics in the Talmud, rabbinic theology, or responsa literature; advanced studies in Aggada; or comparative studies in Palestinian and Babylonian Talmuds.

Special Topics in Talmud and Rabbinic Studies (RB3497)

Credits:3

Special topics in the Talmud, rabbinic theology, or responsa literature; advanced studies in Aggada; or comparative studies in Palestinian and Babylonian Talmuds.

Special Topics in Talmud and Rabbinic Studies (RB3498)

Credits:3

Special topics in the Talmud, rabbinic theology, or responsa literature; advanced studies in Aggada; or comparative studies in Palestinian and Babylonian Talmuds.

Special Topics in Talmud and Rabbinic Studies (RB3499)

Credits:3

Special topics in the Talmud, rabbinic theology, or responsa literature; advanced studies in Aggada; or comparative studies in Palestinian and Babylonian Talmuds.

Independent Studies in Rabbinics (RB4000)

Credits:3

Advanced topics in specialized areas designed for individual study.

Independent Studies in Rabbinics (RB4001)

Credits:3

Individual Thesis Work (RB4500)

Credits:3